25.5 C
Houston
Friday, September 18, 2020

Study: Financial Issues Stop 75 Percent of MS Patients From Getting Treatment

More than three-quarters of Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience financial difficulties that often prevent them from getting treatment, new research claims.

“Our study results demonstrate the high prevalence of financial toxicity for MS patients and the resulting decisions patients make that impact their health care and lifestyle,” said study author Dr. Gelareh Sadigh, an assistant radiology professor at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.

She and her colleagues surveyed 243 adult MS patients visiting neurology clinics and found that 56% reported declines in income after their MS diagnosis, and 37% had a decrease greater than 20%.

More than one-third (35%) of the patients reported not sticking to their medication or medical imaging routines due to the cost. Thirteen percent said they didn’t get recommended imaging tests, which have higher copayments than other health care services, according to the study.

The study, sponsored by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute in Reston, Virginia, is the first to evaluate “financial toxicity” in MS patients and whether financial hardship is associated with forgoing medication and imaging follow-up prescribed in their treatment plan, the authors said.

MS patients can face considerable financial struggles due to expensive treatments, high rates of disability and lost income.

“Over the last 20 years, higher out-of-pocket costs for advanced imaging tests and increased cost sharing have caused the financial burdens on MS patients to escalate. Among medically bankrupt families, MS is associated with the highest total out of-pocket expenditures, exceeding those of cancer patients,” Sadigh said in an institute news release.

The findings were published recently in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal.

“These data underscore the need for shared decision-making and an awareness of patient financial strain when planning treatment strategies,” said study co-author and Neiman Institute affiliate senior research fellow Dr. Richard Duszak.

“In addition to the impact on adherence, financial toxicity was associated with significantly lower physical health-related quality of life, demonstrating the broad consequences of treatment costs for many MS patients,” added Duszak, vice chair for health policy and practice in the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory.

Newsmax

Latest news

Australia Pushes New Measure To Detain COVID “Conspiracy Theorists” 

Weekend demonstrations have flared up in Australia over the last month, as Aussies have vented their frustrations and attempted to take back control of their...

Lord Sumption: Boris Johnson’s “‘Rule Of Six’ Is Pointless, Arbitrary, And Unnecessary”

Via 21stCenturyWire.com, This week former UK Supreme Court justice took to the airwaves to strongly criticise the government’s latest laws designed to tighten restrictions on...

Joe Biden Has Been Around For So Long, Johnny Carson Once Made Fun Of His Lies (VIDEO)

Joe Biden has been in Washington for 47 years. If you want some real perspective on how long that is, consider this. Johnny Carson once...

Related news

What is a ‘randomized controlled trial’?

Chances are in the last six months, you have heard or read the term...

Pandemic restrictions reintroduced across Europe under threat of a second wave

Former hot spots in Europe have recorded dramatic spikes in new coronavirus cases,...

Ron Johnson to isolate after coronavirus exposure

Sen. Ron Johnson is quarantining after being exposed to someone with the coronavirus. ...

Postal Service considered plan to send five masks to every household early in pandemic

U.S. Postal Service leaders drafted plans in early April to distribute millions of...

Here’s where church services are still restricted

Every state since March has weighed the thorny question of how (or if) governments...

New York City to delay school reopenings again

The New York City school system will welcome students to in-person classes in...